Podcast Blog

In a sit down with our Head of Communications, Jack Anderson, our co-founder Ummul Choudhury has a quick chat about her forthcoming book ‘United Nonsense’.

Having worked in the global aid sector for over a decade – including Syria, Palestine andmore recently with refugees in Berlin – Ummul has immense first hand experience andworking knowledge in the field. After setting up C4R and winning several internationalawards (including best small charity), she has turned her attention to exposing the flawednature and disconnected culture of the international NGO system.

Not only does Ummul’s role as a female leader add a necessary salience to the narrative, but her account is made even more unique because it comes from the perspective of someone from “a minority background, [a] Bengali Asian who grew up in London from aworking class background”. This is a perspective, which unfortunately, is just not present in international aid. From a narrative perspective United Nonsense also looks through the optics of a small, newly-formed NGO that is trying to find its way the tricky bureaucratic terrain of the aid sector.

Throughout the book and in our chat, a point that keeps coming up is the disconnect between International NGOs such as the UN (described as ‘The Golden Circle’ and as ‘aidcartels’) and the needs of the local people on the ground. Ummul along with C4R have been at the forefront of the pushing the localisation dialogue – something which aims to put the needs and voices of local people at the centre of any project. Have a listen to the podcast below and find out more about what Ummul’s forthcoming book United Nonsense and the push for localisation in the aid sector.

Have a listen to the podcast below and find out more about what Ummul’s forthcoming book United Nonsense and the push for localisation in the aid sector.