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Female only class in Ruwaad, Amman

In Partnership with

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project

Capoeira4Refugees in collaboration with Ruwwad

Location 

Jabal Nathif, East Amman

Target

This program targets women of all ages to create a safe space where they can come with their children, sisters, mothers and grandmothers, and enjoy some playful exercise.

Social capoeira seeks to undo some of the gender imbalances that restrict women’s mobility in Amman. These classes give women a space to exercise and discover a new artform with all the cultural aspects which come with that, including Portuguese songs and foreign instruments.

Impact

One of these students, a young woman who joined these classes with her mother at the beginning of the program almost two years ago, was particularly passionate about capoeira. She trained hard and was enthusiastic about learning everything about capoeira. She is now one of Capoeira4refugees’ full-time employed trainers. Dania is now providing social capoeira lessons in refugee camps and host communities across Jordan. She is learning about psychosocial support, child protection issues, and gaining experience in the humanitarian sector.

Topics

#Free4Kids
#Marginalised Communities
#Outreach to Host Communities

Contact

hello@capoeira4refugees.org

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Za’atari Refugee Camp, District 5

In Partnership with

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project

Capoeira in the Peace Oasis

Location

Za’atari Refugee Camp, District 5, Jordan

Target

This project targets Syrian refugee children between the ages of 9 and 18 living in Za’atari refugee camp. Capoeira4refugees (C4R) uses social capoeira as a form of psychosocial support to these children, through their many years of expertise working with vulnerable youth.

Za’atari’s residents derive mainly from Syria’s Southwest Dara’a Governorate, which witnessed some of the worst of Syria’s civil war violence.

Impact

Using capoeira and its various elements of music, play and sport, C4R trainers focus on building a strong community amongst its students who share the knowledge capoeira provides but also share a safe space to express themselves. The classes incorporate social rodas which gives students the time and space to discuss opinions and thoughts about the classes as well as life in general.

“I learned from capoeira that you don’t get mad at each other when someone accidentally hits you. We need to have love between us before and after the class.”
(14 YO Male)

Since January, these students have made a great deal of progress in both capoeira and their emotional wellbeing. One girl arrives at the Peace Oasis an hour before the class every time, asking to practice her music. She began capoeira classes timid, but is now leading songs and demonstrating movements to her peers.

This program also empowers local Syrian facilitators who assist in the capoeira classes, giving them private training and attention with the aim that they will take over these classes one day.

“I like capoeira more than other sports because capoeira makes us stronger. The teachers [also] let us do silly movements and just scream. This makes me more relaxed and comfortable.”
(16 YO Female)

Topics

#Free4Kids
#Refugee Camps

Contact

hello@capoeira4refugees.org

 

 

 

 

 

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Irbid host community

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project

Irbid host community

Location 

Irbid, Jordan

Target

This program targets the Syrian refugee community in Irbid, an area in North Jordan close to the Syrian border, and to Dara’a, where many of these refugees came from. Irbid hosts 136,000 Syrian refugees, according to the UNHCR. Around 85% of Syrian refugees live in host communities rather than formal refugee camps, with most living below the poverty line.

This program uses social capoeira as a form of psychosocial support for Syrian refugee youth. Around 25 male and female youth attend these classes regularly.

Impact

The girls learn basic capoeira movements, play games and dance, building a community among themselves. They are so passionate about the music that they research new songs to learn at home, and have started leading songs by themselves.

The young men are advancing in their capoeira movements and physical abilities. Social capoeira training helps them to release stress, focus and play in a space where they are free to be themselves

Topics

#Free4Kids
#Marginalised Communities
#Outreach to host communities

Contact

hello@capoeira4refugees.org

 

 

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Azraq Refugee Camp Village 5

Project Partner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project

Capoeira4Refugees in partnership with NRC

Location

Azraq Refugee Camp Village 5, NRC Youth Centre

Target

Azraq refugee camp’s Village 5 district is one of the most restrictive camps lived in by Syrian refugees. These families are engulfed by barbed-wire topped fence that divides them from the rest of Azraq camp’s residents. Housing the most recent arrivals from Syria, these extra security restrictions isolate the residents from most activities. Village 5 youth have very little to occupy themselves with as they await their security clearance.

Capoeira classes have been held in NRC’s Youth Center for over five months, during which these young males have built a strong community and culture with their capoeira teammates, outside of their daily pressures.

“Capoeira is not about violence but peace, you play with and you don’t play against. You smile with your partner.” (18 YO Male)

Impact

Capoeira in NRC’s Youth Center has made huge strides in building a strong community of young males passionate about capoeira. About 25 regular participants train together, exercising and rapidly learning new movements, flips and dialogue inside the game. Capoeira4Refugee’s trainers provide direction and the positive energy of a capoeira ‘batteria’ (music) to which the students play, learn and encourage each other.

This project has worked on fostering a space where young adults experience something new, entering a new world and culture including the portuguese language, foreign instruments, and an understanding of a physical dialogue that teaches personal space and respect for one another.

“I think I will keep trying to be the leader. I will never let go of capoeira, even if the program ends. I will keep playing capoeira.” (22-year-old male)

Topics

#Free4Kids
#Refugee Camps
#Special Needs

Contact

hello@capoeira4refugees.org

 

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Meet Abed, Changemakers Fellow; Palestine




Despite military occupation and rising social tensions in Palestine, Abed defies the odds to find space for music, sport & play.

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has resulted in  unequal educational opportunities for many young people in the occupied areas. Unicef recently reported that nearly one in four children growing up in conflict zones around the world are out of school. Children who lack accesses to formal education opportunities have even less access to sports and extra-curricular activities. In light of these challenges, Abed decided to do something to support the youth in his community.

Abed’s social capoeira project started in May of 2014 when he was still working with Bidna Capoeira (now Capoeira4Refugees) in Bethany.

Residents of Bethany, one of the three Israeli-controlled administrative divisions in the West Bank, receive limited access to basic services. With support from a few donors, Abed started teaching capoeira to fill in the gap. Although funding for the project through Bidna Capoeira ended in August of 2015, Abed continues to devote his personal time and resources to keep the group going.

“In Palestine, we are still living under occupation. Bethany is surrounded by the wall. we overlook the wall at the centre Where we train. Many young kids can’t go out, and they are frustrated all the time. These challenges make them into troublemakers. But through capoeira, my students have finally found something that makes them active. Capoeira Helps them to become more confident. When you are confident, you are discipline and calm.” -Abed 

Working in Bethany has not been easy. According to a UN report, nearly 300,000 Palestinians are living in the area, and tensions have been high since last autumn due to disputes over access and land. As a result, Palestinian children lack a safe space to play.

“A lot of the time, no space is available, so we train in the street or on my house rooftop, “

Abed says.

Despite these challenges, Abed continues to fight to get a more permanent space for his students to practice capoeira.

“In my opinion, Capoeira is perfect for the kids in marginalized communities in Palestine,” Abed says. “It’s a group activity, which teaches them many life skills and values, including how to resolve conflict and accept differences.”

Abed also constantly strives to promote gender inclusivity in his classes. In the past, he has taught many girls classes in some of the most conservative areas in Palestine (such as Sur Baher Village, Bethany Girls Orphanage, and Shufat Refugee Camp). He is one of few male trainers allowed to work with girls, having earned the trust of many families. Abed has made it his personal mission to promote gender equality through music, sport and play. He has inspired and equipped his assistant, Amer (picture above second from the left), to start a boys and girls capoeira class in his own neighborhood.

Abed’s students huddle together for a cheer before ending capoeira class. This energy within the classroom allows them to momentarily escape from the stresses of occupation and keeps them going for the rest of the week. For Abed, becoming a Capoeira Changemakers Fellow means being able to offer children and youth continuous access to activities that they otherwise would not have access to.

One of Abed’s older students,

Paleto 18, says “capoeira is a sport that helps me to get away from drugs. There’s a major drug issue in this country. Before capoeira, I used to get angry and crash and break things. Now instead of doing that, I turn to capoeira. Capoeira is big enough and it frees me. We are under occupation and capoeira frees me.”

Abed explains: “I’m excited to use the programme to get my projects back up and running and to see the local children completely engaged in Capoeira, games and activities that teach peace, conflict resolution, selfesteem and more. Capoeira is perfect for the kids in marginalized  communities in Palestine. It’s a group activity, which teaches them many life skills and values, including how to resolve conflict and accept differences.”

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Nukanti: Jugando por la Libertad

Project

Nukanti: Jugando por la Libertad

Location

Ciudad Bolívar, Bogotá, Colombia

Target

Playing for Freedom is an award-winning capoeira program aimed at providing psychosocial support to children and youth affected by extreme poverty, violence and forced displacement in Colombia, using capoeira as a tool.

Impact

Currently, the program is active in Ciudad Bolívar, one of the most populated slums on the outskirts of Bogotá, where the majority of the population is internally displaced people (IDPs). Since its beginning in 2008 the program has benefitted nearly 300 children and youth from vulnerable sectors.

Topics

#Marginalised Communities
#Free4Kids

Contact

Website: http://www.nukantifoundation.org/playing-for-freedom-1/
Email: info@nukantifoundation.org

Social Media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NukantiFoundation
Twitter: www.twitter.com/Nukanti